Music

Five Hidden ‘Easter Eggs’ In Classic Rock Hits

View Comments
Credit: JUAN MABROMATA/AFP/Getty Images

Credit: JUAN MABROMATA/AFP/Getty Images

kearthevents Britt Bickel
Web Producer |
Read More

With Easter Sunday approaching, you may be taking the kids out on the hunt for Easter eggs with delicious candy surprises hidden inside. So in the same vain as this beloved holiday tradition, we went on the hunt for a different kind of ‘Easter Egg’ hidden in music.

An ‘Easter Egg’ in terms of music, movies or media is something that’s intentionally hidden within the main work itself, and to the untrained eye may go unnoticed until a savvy fan discovers these secret gems.

Many classic bands have hidden ‘Easter Eggs’ within their music that don’t always pop right out at you. These ‘Easter Eggs’ may not be as good as finding candy or money per say, but it will make you take a second look at some of your favorite albums and perhaps open your eyes to something that’s been right under your nose this whole time.

Pink Floyd’s Secret Message

In the age when many classic rock bands were accused of hiding “satanic” subliminal messages within their songs when played backwards, Pink Floyd actually did – minus the “satanic” part.

Known as “backmasking,” Pink Floyd’s “Empty Spaces” on The Wall harbors a secret message that played normally just sounds like mumbles. However, when you play the clip backwards, you’re greeted with a message that says, “Hello, hunters. Congratulations. You have just discovered the secret message. Please send your answer to Old Pink, care of the Funny Farm, Chalfont–“

Take a listen for yourself:

Led Zeppelin’s Secret Artwork

Who says water color paintings are for kids? Led Zeppelin introduced a grown-up version of water colors on the artwork for their album In Through The Out Door. The only problem is, they didn’t bother to tell anyone the inner sleeve was really a water color painting just waiting to be filled in.

The cover art features a man sitting at a bar with the inner sleeve picturing the contents of what’s on the table in a plain black and white image. However, if you wash over the inner sleeve with water, that plain image becomes permanently filled in with vibrant colors, but who’d want to take the risk of ruining their album art?

John Lennon’s Secret Vocals

We all know John Lennon (and Paul McCartney) wrote The Beatles’ No.1 hit “Lucy In The Sky With Diamonds” off the band’s Sgt. Pepper’s Lonely Hearts Club Band, but did you know he makes a vocal appearance on Elton John’s hit cover version?

Lennon not only sings backing vocals on Elton’s famous cover of the Beatles tune, but plays guitar under a pseudonym
Dr. Winston O’Boogie. Elton’s version with Lennon’s background vocals topped the Billboard pop charts for two weeks in 1975.

Monty Python’s Secret Double Album

The British comedy troupe Monty Python decided to confuse fans by hiding two completely different sets of tracks on the same side of the original vinyl release of Matching Tie And Handkerchief.

Using the idea of locked grooves, which plays the last part of a vinyl album in a continues loop, Monty Python pressed their album with double grooves, so that depending where the needle lands, it plays a completely different set of tracks.

To make fans scratch their heads even more, Monty Python never disclosed the hidden tracks to listeners and even labeled both sides of the album “Side 2.”

Rush’s Secret Morse Code

The intro to Rush’s epic song “YYZ” contains a clever secret message hidden within the memorable rhythm. The rhythm played is that of the letters ‘YYZ’ tapped out in Morse Code, and the letters also double as the code for Toronto’s International Airport – the hometown of the band.

Just try to wrap your mind around that clever ‘Easter Egg’ as you attempt to perfect this challenging rhythm in Rock Band.

Of course this is just scratching the surface of the many hidden gems tucked away within music. Want to see even more hidden ‘Easter Eggs’ in music? Head over to cracked.com for more!

View Comments
blog comments powered by Disqus
Follow

Get every new post delivered to your Inbox.

Join 238 other followers