Music

Celebrity Tweets About Dick Clark

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Photo: LEE CELANO/Getty Images

Photo: LEE CELANO/Getty Images

Musicians and entertainers from all genres and several generations took to Twitter to express their sadness over the passing of legendary radio and television personality Dick Clark. Artists whose careers have spanned decades and whose careers were boosted by Clark’s various media holdings, along with younger acts who grew up watching his shows and New Year’s specials felt the loss and shared their feelings. The social network saw thousands of tributes, here are some tributes (along with some issued as “statements” to the press).

Smokey Robinson was an artist on Motown Records, as well as the Vice President and one of the founders of the record company, and Clark’s American Bandstand helped to give exposure to several acts on the label.

Ann Wilson of Heart was part of the generation who experienced rock and roll on TV via American Bandstand.

Dick Clark is most closely associated with rock and roll, but standards singer Tony Bennett tweeted that Clark supported his more traditional music.

Shock-rocker Alice Cooper, a long time friend and supporter, posted his thoughts about Dick Clark on his website: “I used to come home from elementary school to watch American Bandstand. It had all the new songs, all the new dances, and it had the happiest guy in the world presenting them to you. I had no idea that later in my career I would know Dick Clark on a professional level.” Cooper then tweeted a photo of a thank you letter Clark sent him, after Alice hosted Clark’s American Music Awards.

The Jackson 5 performed on American Bandstand, and Michael Jackson did as well, early in his solo career. Janet Jackson tweeted about Clark:

R&B singer Anita Baker pointed out that Clark gave a national platform to artists of all genres.

Younger artists from heavy metal, hip-hop and country music also weighed in:

A number of broadcasters tweeted their respect to the man who revolutionized the profession: Caron Daly, a TV and radio host from AMP in Los Angeles, who was close with Clark (and had a New Year’s TV special that rivaled Clark’s New Year’s Rockin’ Eve) offered this statement: “We lost an icon today. I will always cherish the personal time we had together. I am forever indebted to Dick Clark and his legacy. My heart goes out to his family.”

Danny Bonaduce from KZOK in Seattle offered this on the station’s website: “My mother and father were great friends with Dick Clark, so I’ve actually known him since before I was born. My grandfather gave him his very first job. It was on the radio in Philadelphia. Dick Clark gave me my first job when I was 2 years old in a television commercial. We stayed in contact for his entire life. People always remember his talent, but I will always remember his loyalty. I will also remember the fact that he beat me at a push-up contest when he was 74 years old. He was much loved and will be missed.” He tweeted an abridged version:

Finally, President Obama offered the following statement: “Michelle and I are saddened to hear about the passing of Dick Clark. With American Bandstand, he introduced decades’ worth of viewers to the music of our times. He reshaped the television landscape forever as a creative and innovative producer. And, of course, for 40 years, we welcomed him into our homes to ring in the New Year. But more important than his groundbreaking achievements was the way he made us feel — as young and vibrant and optimistic as he was. As we say a final ‘so long’ to Dick Clark, America’s oldest teenager, our thoughts and prayers are with his family and friends — which number far more than he knew.”

–Brian Ives, CBS Local

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