On-Air

The Best Fake Bands From TV & Film

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Photo by Matt Cardy/Getty Images

Photo by Matt Cardy/Getty Images

kearthevents Britt Bickel
Web Producer |
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Originally dreamed up for TV or movies just to entertain the viewers, these fictional bands have produced very real music that has become just as popular as real groups in the industry. Check out some of our favorite fake bands from TV and film over the years that spun off into huge music sensations!

The Monkees

Created for the 1966 sitcom of the same name, The Monkees, made up of Micky Dolenz, Michael Nesmith, Peter Tork, and Davy Jones, was initially just created for TV. However, the popularity of this quartet grew and eventually started performing live and recording their own music even after the show was cancelled in ’68.

The Partridge Family

Much like The Monkees, the fictional family band The Partridge Family was created for the 1970 sitcom based off the real life band The Cowsills. Fronted by David Cassidy as Keith Partridge, the group’s biggest hit “I Think I Love You” reached No.1 on the Billboard charts.

The Rutles

A parody rock group of The Beatles created by Eric Idle and Neil Innes of Monty Python, The Rutles started out as a fake band on TV, but their parody music quickly grew legs of its own and drew a big following.

The Wonders

In the 1996 film That Thing You Do written and directed by Tom Hanks, we see the rise and fall of the fictional ’60s band The Wonders as a result of their catchy hit “That Thing You Do.”

The Silver Platters

Performing “Sunshine Day” on the hit TV show, The Brady Bunch kids call themselves The Silver Platters as they try out for the “Pete Sterne Amateur Hour” so they can raise money to buy their parents an engraved silver platter as their anniversary gift.

Spinal Tap

Taking a cue from The Rutles, Rob Reiner’s “mockumentary” of the fictional heavy metal group Spinal Tap is a cult favorite, and their music is just as memorable as the hilarious moments in the movie.

Blues Brothers

Created by Saturday Night Live alums Dan Aykroyd and the late John Belushi, the soul/blues duo rose from just a musical sketch on the late night show into a feature-length movie that featured many artist cameos including a young Aretha Franklin.

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